The Hunter of the Month!




My is Damian Lentini, I'm 43 years old, and I'm from Kulpmont pa. I had the opportunity to hunt Alaskan Mt Goat in September of 2017. This was my 3rd time hunting in Alaska,  previously taken grizzly bear, caribou, and wolverine. This time we would be hunting in Puget Bay Alaska with my father Dennis Lentini , Hal lapointe ( registered guide) and Billy Michna (assistant guide). We flew out of Anchorage Alaska via beaver float plane  on September 18th and landed at base camp in Puget Bay Alaska.  Base camp was a small 8ft by 6ft cabin with a small wood stove. It was on the edge of a lake with the ocean about 100 yrs away. The mountains were jagged rising straight up out of the ocean and climbing them looked impossible. We were excited that day, as we could see mt goats from base camp as soon as we landed, we glassed for a few hours before getting  a good night's rest.
 The next day, our hunt started on September the 19th. The first day of the hunt the weather was sunny and 55° and we would climb from sea level to  about 3000 ft. I would describe  the terrain as very steep, rocky, and mostly unforgiving.  Mt goats live mostly where no other animals want to be, at the top of cliffs overlooking rock outcrops hundreds of feet down. Eating sparse vegetation and walking on trails only a couple of inches wide in spots. These were the same trails we would climb up to get within a few hundred yards to have the opportunity to harvest one of these majestic goats. We climbed to the top of the mountain in about 10 hrs, using our arms just as much as our legs while carrying about 60lb. Frame packs. That was the hardest day of the hunt for me. By the time I got to our spike camp that day I was totally exhausted and dehydrated on top of it, cramping frequently last two hrs of that day.  We set up spike camp (a two man and a three man tent) and ate freeze dried mt house meals that evening. It was at that point where the weather turned bad. That evening a storm rolled in off the ocean. We had 60+ mph winds and drenching rains with temperatures in the 40s. We were socked in our tents for about a day and a half. Watching a steady stream of water coming through the floor of our tent and winds that would continously flatter our tent on top of us. We lay there cold and wet praying for the weather to lighten up. On the morning of 21st of September,  there was a brief let up in the storm and Hal came over to our tent and informed my father and I that there was a good billy about 500 yds away working it's way towards us through the cliffs on the other side of the canyon. I quickly  got my gear on and exited the tent and grabbed my rifle (.300RUM). I set up my gun next to a rock outcrop and ranged the billy at 420 yds. The billy then lay down for about twenty minutes and I planned to take him as soon as he stood. It seemed  like forever waiting to take that shot, with the winds still blowing hard,  fog and rain blowing in and out but the billy finally stood and started walking away. I waited until he stopped moving and took the shot at about 450 yds. The nosler accubond bullet did its job hitting the billy on the first shot and my goat went tumbling down the jagged cliffs landing about 300 feet below. Hal and i immediately grabbed our packs and headed down the steep mountain towards my billy goat sliding almost uncontrollably most of the way. I was very exciting upon reaching my mt goat, his horns measured 8 3/4" and was about 8 yrs old. I was very excited that just had taken a beautiful mature alaskan mt goat . After taking some photos and briefly celebrating, we packed out my goat getting back to the camp after dark. That's when the weather got really nasty. That night it got so windy our tent ripped apart from the extreme winds and my father and I would have to seek shelter in Hal and Billy's 3 man tent. There we would lay, four men all over 200 lbs, for 2 more days. We never left the tent during that time, we were afraid  if we got out of the tent we would be blown off the mt. We ate mt house and went to the bathroom in the empty bags, while getting our water off of the tents rain fly , we were all praying  that our tent would handle the extreme weather and the storm would let up soon. After 4 days, on September 23, the weather broke and we decided to head to base camp to get dry and get more supplies. We cautiously headed down the rain soaked mt through the fog watching every step, now with an extra 150 lbs of goat on our backs. The trip down the mountain was just as nerving as going up,  one wrong step and you could plummet down to the rocks hundreds of feet below. We finally made it back base camp that day before dark, it took about 7 hrs to get down. We were all relived to get down to base camp and out of the extreme weather.  There we would get a good night's rest and a hot meal. My father hunted the next few days out of base camp with the weather being so wet and unpredictable,  and on September 26he also got a mt goat while hunting along the beach glassing the cliffs above. He took his goat @350 yds with a .300 win mag. His goat was 7" billy goat roughly 5 yrs old. After, my father got his goat our hunt was complete and we flew back to Anchorage on September 29th. It was a great  feeling to have harvested two beautiful alaskan mt goats in some our the worst weather I have every experienced. I also had a new appreciation for the mt. Goat. These animals are tough as nails, and the terrain they live in is extreme. There are no short cuts while hunting goats and the reward of harvesting one of these mt goats in exhilarating. I now know why these animals are considered to be one of the hardest animals to take in the world. Being in great physical condition is a must for this hunt. I started training months prior to the hunt, often carrying a 100lb pack up and down the mountains of Pennsylvania for hours at a time. Mt goat hunting is not for everyone and it will test you both physically and mentally. But the reward of taking one of these animals is both extreme and unforgettable! 



My is Damian Lentini, I'm 43 years old, and I'm from Kulpmont pa. I had the opportunity to hunt Alaskan Mt Goat in September of 2017. This was my 3rd time hunting in Alaska,  previously taken grizzly bear, caribou, and wolverine. This time we would be hunting in Puget Bay Alaska with my father Dennis Lentini , Hal lapointe ( registered guide) and Billy Michna (assistant guide). We flew out of Anchorage Alaska via beaver float plane  on September 18th and landed at base camp in Puget Bay Alaska.  Base camp was a small 8ft by 6ft cabin with a small wood stove. It was on the edge of a lake with the ocean about 100 yrs away. The mountains were jagged rising straight up out of the ocean and climbing them looked impossible. We were excited that day, as we could see mt goats from base camp as soon as we landed, we glassed for a few hours before getting  a good night's rest.
 The next day, our hunt started on September the 19th. The first day of the hunt the weather was sunny and 55° and we would climb from sea level to  about 3000 ft. I would describe  the terrain as very steep, rocky, and mostly unforgiving.  Mt goats live mostly where no other animals want to be, at the top of cliffs overlooking rock outcrops hundreds of feet down. Eating sparse vegetation and walking on trails only a couple of inches wide in spots. These were the same trails we would climb up to get within a few hundred yards to have the opportunity to harvest one of these majestic goats. We climbed to the top of the mountain in about 10 hrs, using our arms just as much as our legs while carrying about 60lb. Frame packs. That was the hardest day of the hunt for me. By the time I got to our spike camp that day I was totally exhausted and dehydrated on top of it, cramping frequently last two hrs of that day.  We set up spike camp (a two man and a three man tent) and ate freeze dried mt house meals that evening. It was at that point where the weather turned bad. That evening a storm rolled in off the ocean. We had 60+ mph winds and drenching rains with temperatures in the 40s. We were socked in our tents for about a day and a half. Watching a steady stream of water coming through the floor of our tent and winds that would continously flatter our tent on top of us. We lay there cold and wet praying for the weather to lighten up. On the morning of 21st of September,  there was a brief let up in the storm and Hal came over to our tent and informed my father and I that there was a good billy about 500 yds away working it's way towards us through the cliffs on the other side of the canyon. I quickly  got my gear on and exited the tent and grabbed my rifle (.300RUM). I set up my gun next to a rock outcrop and ranged the billy at 420 yds. The billy then lay down for about twenty minutes and I planned to take him as soon as he stood. It seemed  like forever waiting to take that shot, with the winds still blowing hard,  fog and rain blowing in and out but the billy finally stood and started walking away. I waited until he stopped moving and took the shot at about 450 yds. The nosler accubond bullet did its job hitting the billy on the first shot and my goat went tumbling down the jagged cliffs landing about 300 feet below. Hal and i immediately grabbed our packs and headed down the steep mountain towards my billy goat sliding almost uncontrollably most of the way. I was very exciting upon reaching my mt goat, his horns measured 8 3/4" and was about 8 yrs old. I was very excited that just had taken a beautiful mature alaskan mt goat . After taking some photos and briefly celebrating, we packed out my goat getting back to the camp after dark. That's when the weather got really nasty. That night it got so windy our tent ripped apart from the extreme winds and my father and I would have to seek shelter in Hal and Billy's 3 man tent. There we would lay, four men all over 200 lbs, for 2 more days. We never left the tent during that time, we were afraid  if we got out of the tent we would be blown off the mt. We ate mt house and went to the bathroom in the empty bags, while getting our water off of the tents rain fly , we were all praying  that our tent would handle the extreme weather and the storm would let up soon. After 4 days, on September 23, the weather broke and we decided to head to base camp to get dry and get more supplies. We cautiously headed down the rain soaked mt through the fog watching every step, now with an extra 150 lbs of goat on our backs. The trip down the mountain was just as nerving as going up,  one wrong step and you could plummet down to the rocks hundreds of feet below. We finally made it back base camp that day before dark, it took about 7 hrs to get down. We were all relived to get down to base camp and out of the extreme weather.  There we would get a good night's rest and a hot meal. My father hunted the next few days out of base camp with the weather being so wet and unpredictable,  and on September 26he also got a mt goat while hunting along the beach glassing the cliffs above. He took his goat @350 yds with a .300 win mag. His goat was 7" billy goat roughly 5 yrs old. After, my father got his goat our hunt was complete and we flew back to Anchorage on September 29th. It was a great  feeling to have harvested two beautiful alaskan mt goats in some our the worst weather I have every experienced. I also had a new appreciation for the mt. Goat. These animals are tough as nails, and the terrain they live in is extreme. There are no short cuts while hunting goats and the reward of harvesting one of these mt goats in exhilarating. I now know why these animals are considered to be one of the hardest animals to take in the world. Being in great physical condition is a must for this hunt. I started training months prior to the hunt, often carrying a 100lb pack up and down the mountains of Pennsylvania for hours at a time. Mt goat hunting is not for everyone and it will test you both physically and mentally. But the reward of taking one of these animals is both extreme and unforgettable! 

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